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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here are some how to guides for car care.

IT'S ALL IN THE PREPARATION

These are only guide lines you may have a better system or more comments to add

IF SO PLEASE ADD TO THE THREAD

some helpful links and on line suppliers----who I have used and found to be good

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http://www.detailingworld.co.uk/
http://www.polishedbliss.co.uk/
http://www.elitecarcare.co.uk/
http://www.cleanyourcar.co.uk/
http://www.carwashnwax.com/

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First Step Snow Foam application

I use a Kracher Pressure washer 6.75 and a HD (Heavy Duty) Snow Foam Lance.

Products Mixed are 30ml Chemical Guys Citrus Snow foam and 15ml Meguiar's Hyper- Wash. Mixed with hottish water in snow foam bottle. Apply to vehicle as seen below and leave for 5 mins roughly. This is very good for removing all the dirt and grit from the car prior to washing using the two bucket system as explained below.







the two bucket explained

The 2 bucket method is basically what it says. You get two buckets to wash your vehicle, one with car wash solution in and one with just clean water.

Once you have hosed the car down with an open hose to remove any loose contamination you put the wash mitt into the wash solution and start at the top of the vehicle and work down. Every time you need to recharge your wash mitt with wash solution you rinse the wash mitt out in the bucket of clean water to help prevent contamination your wash solution.

Once you have finished this you ?chase? the water off of the bodywork with an open hose from top to bottom which reduces the amount of water sat on the surface. Then all you need to do is dry the car off.

If you are using a sponge to wash your car then you can quite easily trap grit between the face of the sponge and the bodywork. This is what puts in most of those annoying "swirl marks" you can see in certain lights which are thousands of tiny scratches in the clear coat lacquer. A wash mitt has pile and gives the grit somewhere to go rather than just trapping it against the bodywork. Using the two bucket method further reduces the chance of doing damage, but clear coat lacquers on today?s vehicles are so soft that some marking is almost inevitable

An additional tip for the summer is to mix a small amount of wash mix and wash the wheels first then ditch this get a fill up of new and wash the rest of the car. This means you don't get nasty water spots when the sun dries the water on the roof and bonnet while you wash the wheels.

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clay bar detailed:

A product that has recently come to promenance in the world of detailing is Detailing Clay. In this thread I aim to write a general guide to what clay is, what its used for and some generic tips for how to get results from clay. I will focus on the use of clay for the removal of bonded contaminants.

What Is Detailing Clay??
While clay is growing in popularity with many detailers now, it has certainly not become a well known "household" car detailing product. Detailing clay is a substance that is designed to remove bonded contaminatns from paint, leaving the paint smooth as glass, allowing easier and more fruitful applications of polihses, glazes, sealents and waxes. Detailing Clay is wiped gently across the paint which needs to be lubricated with a lubricant such as a Quick Detailer spray.

Clay, like polishes, comes in levels of aggressiveness - if you are a beginner with clay, do start with a mild clay such as Meguiars Quik Clay, Meguiars Professional Mirror Glaze Clay (mild, the blue bar) or Sonus Green Clay. These mild clays should be enough to remove bonded contaminants from most cars, only step up to a more aggressive clay if absolutely needed.

Clay can be used on paintwork, glass, and wheels. Always use separate clay on each - ie dont first clay your wheels then use the same clay to clay your paint, as all the brake dust embedded in the clay from the wheels will scratch the paint.

What Are Bonded Contaminants??
When you come to wash your car, the paint will be covered in lots of fresh contiaminats such as dust, mud, possibly bird boms and many others. In addition, the paint will also have a growing amount of bonded contaminants attached to it, which accumulate over time:

When you wash your car, the fresh contaminants are removed from the paint and the paintwork looks clean. However, washing will leave behine the bonded contaminats which are attached to the paint as if they had been glued on:

These bonded contaminats are hard to see, so after washing your paintwork looks clean. However, if you gently run your fingers acorss the paintwork you may feel that the paintwork feels rough - a bit like stubble in a way. This roughness, grittiness that you are feeling is the bonded contaminants in the paint.

Examples of bonded contaminants are:

> Brake dust - sharp, so embeds itself in the paint
> Industrial fallout
> Tree sap - very sticky so adheres strongly to the paint

and there are many others as well which you're car is subjected to on a regular basis.

Removing Bonded Contaminants - Clay
In order to remove the bonded contaminats and restore a glassy smooth feel to the paint, detailing clay is used. As well as leaving a pleasingly smooth feel to the paint, when you come to polish, glaze, seal or wax, it means that you are now sealing in remaining bonded contaminants if you have removed them by clay. Simply washing and waxing will not remove bonded contaminants, they will be left behind and then just waxed over.

Clay basically works by grabbing hold of the bonded contaminants and pulling them off of the paint surface:

The contmainats become stuck in the softer clay where they remain. A safety note when using clay here - these bonded contaminats are stuck into the clay and the clay represents a flat surface. Therefore, surface marring can occur if not enough lubricant is used, or the clay is not kneaded regularly enough to a clean side - please see also the section on using clay...

This leaves the paint finish glassy smooth. Clay can remove the bonded contaminants listed above, however some adhesive contaminants such as tar may need a dedicated tar remover as they are very highly adhesive.

Using Clay
Before claying, always wash fresh contaminants off of the car. First and foremost, always follow the manufacturers instruction for the correct use of their detailing clay. What follows here is a generic guide of tips for the safe use of clay which I use from experience of using clay.

To clay your car, you will need a clay bar and an associated lubricant to lubricate the surface and the clay bar - examples of such lubricants are:

> Meguiars Quick Detailer Spray
> Meguiars Last Touch Detailing Spray
> Meguiars #34 Final Inspection
> Clearkote Clay Lubricant
> Pinnacle Poly Clay Lubricant

and there are others that can be used too.

About 40 - 50g of clay is sufficient to clay a moderately sized car. If using Meguiars Quick clay, for example, break off one third to one half of the clay bar (the bigger the car, the more clay you may need).

Roll the clay up into a ball, then out into a sausage shape and finally flatten it out into the palm of your hand. When doing this ensure that the clay is warm and quite soft. It clay gets cold, it can be hard or brittle and this can risk inducing surface marring on the paint. Throughout the claying process, always ensure that the clay remains nice and warm and doesn't go brittle or hard.

Work on small areas at a time, I start with the roof, and then the bonnet, then the top half of the sides, then the boot, then the bottom half of the sides (like washing, do the cleaner areas first). I always spray a panel with quick detailer and wipe off before claying it to remove and rogue dust particles that may have blown onto the paint that may induce marring.

Work on small areas of paintwork at a time - about 2' by 2'. Spray the area with the clay lubricant, enough to wet the surface quite thoroughly. Also spray the clay with lubricant as well. Gently wipe the clay in a fore and aft motion over the lubricated area using only finger light pressure:

Never clay over a dry area of paint, and if the paint begins to dry out before you are happy that the surface contaminants have been removed (paint will feel smooth), spray on more lubricant. Keep the clay lubricated as well. Once the paintwork feels smooth, gently wipe the remaining clay lubricant away using a soft microfibre towel.

Knead the clay very regularly - this not only keeps the clay warm, but when kneading expose a clean side of the clay. Remember that clay is picking up sharp particles, if you do the whole car with one side of clay you will induce surface marring as all the sharp particles stuck in the clay will ineveitably come into contact with the paint. For this reason, knead the clay regularly and only ever use finger light pressure. When a clean side of clay can no longer be revealed, discard the clay.

Continue until the car is completed. Note that many clays will remove some or all (depending on aggressiveness) of the wax/sealent protection, so always follow up claying with polishing and glazing if required, followed by sealing and/or waxing.

Some Notes on Safe Clay Use
Clay is safe to use if used with care. However, if not used with care it can induce surface marring.

Always regularly knead the clay to a clean side.

Always keep both the clay and the paint surface well lubricated.

Use only finger light pressure

If you drop the clay on the ground, discard it as it will pick up tons of dust and grit and dirt from the ground that will inflict damage to paint.

Keep clay warm, and supple - if it gets cold, hard and brittle it will induce marring, so another reason to keep kneading regularly, especially in winter.

And there we have it, a quick generic starters' guide to clay.

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Polishing the vehicle.

There are mainly three methods for polishing the vehicle.

By Hand - Dual Action Polisher - Rotary Polisher. There are a vast array of polishes available for machine polishers which can all be found in the links at the start of this thread.

For step by step guides to machine polishing I suggest a quick search on http://www.detailingworld.co.uk

If polishing by hand then Autoglym Super Resin Polish is consider to be the best for removing light swirls and has good fillers.
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Glaze

For me this is my next step after polishing. Applied in the same manor as polish and a panel at a time then buffed off.

Chemical Guys ---EZ creme

Features
.Delivers unparalled shine and protection
.Light cleaning ability to remove minor imperfections
.Reduces static charge ,minimising dust
.Easy on easy off formula
.Great on dark and light coloured cars

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Next step is the Sealant

I use Jetseal 109 I find it to be a very good product although they are many good sealants available

Features
An ultra WET-SHINE high-gloss long life sealant available exclusively through Clean and Shiny. Jetseal109? is a unique anti-corrosion sealant developed to provide the finest protection available for paint, fiberglass, aluminum, chrome, alloy metals, and other substrates. Developed exclusively for the aerospace industry, JETSEAL109? was developed to provide the ultimate protection from the harshest environmental elements.

Jetseal109? is now available for automobiles in the same nano-tech ultra durable consistency. Jetseal109? (Paint Sealant) bonds with the exterior of your auto giving it a mirror-like wet finish, that is virtually impenetrable. Jetseal109? is not a wax, polish, or Teflon?. Jetseal109? is an organically modified Sealant bonded with an acrylic crystalline at a nono-tech scale allowing it to bond to paint molecularly delivering a durable high gloss shield. This ability to chemical bond at a nano-tech scale allows the products to deliver superior results never before achieved from regular chemical formulations. Jetseal109? is to be applied in 2 coats to assure proper coverage. Jetseal109 ? will not crack, fade, discolor, or peel and can be used on all chrome, polished aluminum, Carbon Fiber, Carbon Fiber/Fiberglass Composites, Glass, Fiberglass, Gel Coated Fiberglass and even painted Plastic. Jetseal109? delivers the finest shine and protection under the sun

Directions:

Pour a small amount onto applicator or microfiber pad and apply to entire vehicle in a thin, even coat. Jetseal109? will bond with clean paint surfaces within 15 minutes.

Once removed allow 20 min. time and apply a second layer to assure even coverage.

If you prefer, you can apply this product with your PC or Dual Action polisher and a gray/black finishing pad. Work at a speed no greater than 4.5 and do not apply pressure.

Use a microfiber bonnet for buffing off.

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WAX/LSP (Last stage protection)

There are so many products out in the market.

I use:

Checmical Guys 50/50
Zymol Concours
DoDo Supernatural.

To date I have to say for a complete range of products you won't do better than DoDo click on link below to read a view their products.

http://www.theultimatefinish.co.uk/Stor ... turerId=43
 
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Fiona,

Q. Are the small Meguiar applicator pads worth it? I almost bought some, but was put off by the size (so small)

Kaine
 

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the applicator pads are £2.99 for 2 pads plus don't forget your discount and they are about a size of an average hand (so no spec on size)

on all items from meguiars that i can get away with posting i will to save you guys money. (cloths pads that kinda thing)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The best way to remove wax from black plastic trim

Peanut butter - non crunchy

seriously it works, but peanut oil will work just as well.
 

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Leather Conditioning Stuff

http://www.liquidleather.com

I have no contact or interest with this company, but am impressed by this product.

I use this as i quite like the smell of leather in a car...leaves the leather soft and matt and smelling strongly of leather (not sticky or shiny), is useful when coming to sell...beware you you can end up smelling like leather if you are not careful with it!!!

The scuff master is excellent for the unfortunate accidents that sometimes occur....
 

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Agree. Great product
 

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Meguiars Hot Rims (nice safe cleaner, that really works) along with an alloy wheel cleaning brush (from Meguiars or even halfords). Hose off and wash clean. Repeat for any stubborn patches.

Wax, to make cleaning easier in future.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
carljohnston said:
Anyone got any good ways / ideas to clean 18" Valeys and any product to protect them......

Thanks...

Carl
I try not to use Alloy cleaner anymore. I just get a small sponge with some fairy liquid and hot water and wash the wheels once a week. I reckon most alloy wheels cleaners are to harsh.

I would polish your wheels with NXT or whatever and then apply a coat of poorboys wheel sealent. Think http://www.motorgeek.co.uk sell poorboys stuff.
 

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pilgrim said:
Yes I check mine fairly regularly and they are OK within the limit I can't remember the exact range 0.4 of a bar I think. It rather depends on a the pressure level it was set at. I normally set the tyres slightly over by a couple of lbs that then takes care of any external temperature changes.

Just checked and it is 0.4 bar or 5.8lbs..
A busy weekend cleaning the inside of the wheels and waxing them after six months
Before

After


"What did u use to get them sooooo clean??? and what type of wax did u use?? How long dose it protect them for?? I have already noticed my Valleys quality sliping...."

The items I use to clean the wheels,first inside and out with hot soapy water to get the worst off, then depending on the gunge that's left.
Use the hot wheels, or if there is tar or heavy deposits of brake dust, the meths. again wash off.
Then use the paint restorer and then the carnauber wax which makes it easier to clean the next time. I try and do this every six months.

 

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pilgrim said:
"What did u use to get them sooooo clean??? and what type of wax did u use?? How long dose it protect them for?? I have already noticed my Valleys quality sliping...."
The items I use to clean the wheels,first inside and out with hot soapy water to get the worst off, then depending on the gunge that's left.
Use the hot wheels, or if there is tar or heavy deposits of brake dust, the meths. again wash off.
Then use the paint restorer and then the carnauber wax which makes it easier to clean the next time. I try and do this every six months.
Thanks for that....

What, would it take about 1hour r so / rim???

Thanks again

Carl
 

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Hi Just had my treg about two weeks and some XXXXer drew along the side of it with a black permanent marker last night anyone have any ideas about removing it without damaging the paintwork?
 

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deano,

welcome to the forum - sorry to hear about your prob

I'd imagine a good t-cut and polish would remove it - you could also try a claybar

Kaine
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
deano said:
Hi Just had my treg about two weeks and some XXXXer drew along the side of it with a black permanent marker last night anyone have any ideas about removing it without damaging the paintwork?
your best bet is to put a post up on

http://www.detailingworld.co.uk
 

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What with the summer coming(hopefully) I'm wondering what you all use for getting rid of flies/moths/tree sap etc that really get dried in and stick to the front/windscreen and lights?

I know I'm going to get some stick for this but the only product I've ever found o be 100% succesful is CIF or similar. For the windscreen especially, you know when even though you have cleaned it thourougly it still has a thin film of grease/oil or whatever gets thrown off from the back of lorries in particular. It's always more noticable when its raining and you get a splodgy look on the windscreen. I also use the CIF just to wipe down the wiper blades, you'd be amazed at the amount of rubbish that comes off the blades.

Now I realise that if you use a lot of CIF this will have a scouring action, but the quantity I use is so minimal and diluted, but it does get rid of the grease. Holts used to have a spray can product that foamed up that nearly id as good a job, but for love nor money I can't find it on the market anymore.

Waiting for my slating.......Clarkyi
 
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